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Fuzz Bastard Prince Nymph Fly Tying Video

Posted on March 4th, 2021 in Fly Tying Videos

I developed this nymph on and mostly for the Gibbon, but it’s a good choice anytime you’re looking for a changeup from a conventional Prince. Fish it either under a big bushy dry or in a bobber or Euro-nymphing rig.

Note that it was originally called a Hula Princess and this is the name given in the video. The pattern also works well tied in traditional Hare’s Ear, Pheasant Tail, olive, tan, and other colors.

Hook: Any standard-length jig nymph hook, #12-18. Here, #16.

Bead: Gold slotted tungsten to match hook. Here 3/32″.

Thread: 8/0 black.

Shuck: Short tuft of crinkled ginger synthetic yarn.

Rib: Small to medium gold Ultra Wire, here Brassie.

Abdomen: 2-4 strands of peacock herl, depending on hook size and herl quality. Here 3 strands are used.

Wing: Tuft of cream or white crinkled synthetic yarn, clipped Serendipity-style.

“Hackle:” Brown dubbing blend of your choice, tied loop-style and if necessary trimmed to length. Here brown acrylic and pheasant tail Ice Dub are used, but squirrel, hare’s ear, or other nymph dubbings would also work.

Caddis Cripple Fly Tying Video

Posted on March 4th, 2021 in Fly Tying Videos

Caddis Cripple

New tying vid: Caddis Cripple

While this color is intended for use on the Firehole River, where it matches the crucial June and September White Miller or Nectopsyche caddis, a few color tweaks makes this pattern match any caddis you wish, and it also makes a good low-riding attractor dry for summer. Tie them in olive-brown for the upcoming Mother’s Day Caddis Hatch, imminent on the Yellowstone & Madison!

Recipe

Hook: Short shank dry, #12-20 (especially #14-16). Here, #16.

Thread: 8/0 to match or contrast overall color tones of the fly. Here, cream.

Body: Dubbing of your choice. Here, golden Arizona Synthetic Peacock. Keep the body sparse and rather scraggly.

Wing and Head: Widow’s Web or similar hydrophobic synthetic. Here, beige. Typical “realistic” colors are caddis tan and light tan. Typical “attractor” colors are white, polar bear, and beige.

Hackle: 4-5 turns of saddle hackle, trimmed under the hook. Here, barred light ginger.

Delektable Spanker Nymph Fly Tying Video

Posted on March 4th, 2021 in Fly Tying Videos

Delektable Spanker Nymph: Introduction

Dan Delekta’s Lil Spanker and Big Spanker are red hot “guide flies” in southwest Montana. In essence, the Delektable Spanker Nymph series consists of Pheasant Tail and Lightning Bug variations tied with long flash legs and CDC collars. This particular color variant tied jig-style was my top-producing nymph on guided trips on the Yellowstone and Stillwater Rivers from the middle of August through about September 20 during the 2020 season. To learn more about Dan Delekta’s flies, visit this page and peruse his catalog.

I am now accepting bookings for the 2021 season. In fact I am already about 1/3 booked during the month of July, so if you’re looking to book a guided trip, it makes sense to get on the phone soon.

Video

Delektable Spanker Nymph: Recipe

Hook: 60-degree barbless standard jig, #12-18.

Bead: Slotted tungsten, here gold.

Thread: 8/0 To match or slightly contrast with body, here 8/0 light brown.

Tail: Speckled game bird or hackle, here medium pardo cod-de-leon.

Abdomen: Pheasant Tail fibers, Flashabou, or tinsel. Here holographic gold Flashabou.

Rib: Copper wire, here brown in Brassies size.

Wing Case: Tinsel, here medium opal Mirage.

Thorax: Peacock herl or flashy dubbing, here brown stone SLF dub.

Legs: Krystal Flash or Midge Krystal Flash, here tan Midge Krystal Flash.

Collar: CDC, here brown.

Pink AMEX Czech Nymph Fly Tying Video

Posted on March 4th, 2021 in Fly Tying Videos

The pink AMEX Czech is one of the most popular nymph patterns in winter and early spring on the Missouri River, and a good bet on any tailwater stream. It suggests both eggs and dead/dying scuds, and as such is a good “junk bug” attractor pattern on tailwaters.

While normally tied on a scud hook, I prefer to tie larger versions (#12-14) on jig hooks with tungsten beads, to cut down on hangups. Pair these with some smaller fly, such as a Pink Lightning Bug.

In addition to the AMEX Czech, it’s also worth checking out the “Rainbow Czech,” which is generally similar except with the dubbing colors reversed and a full scud-style shellback. Both patterns bear some similarity to the Pink Squirrel nymph popular in the Driftless region of the upper Midwest.

Hook: Lightning Strike Jig, #12-18, or #10-16 Umpqua C450BL (note: the Lightning Strikes tend to run a touch big).

Bead: Nickel slotted tungsten, 5/32″ to 3/32″

Thread: 6/0 or 8/0 fl. fire orange.

Rib: Black Hareline Midge or Micro tubing. Here a sub for the midge tubing called Crystal String is used.

Abdomen: Bighorn pink Wapsi sow-scud dubbing, or comparable dubbing blend.

Wing Case: Large or medium opal tinsel depending on fly size.

Thorax: Rainbow Wapsi sow-scud dubbing.

Pink Lightning Bug Fly Tying Video

Posted on March 4th, 2021 in Fly Tying Videos

Pink Lightning Bug Introduction

Pink Lightning Bug nymphs are among the top winter flies in Montana, especially on the Missouri River where they’re effective from December or January through mid-May.

Though most Lightning Bugs look like slender, flashy mayfly nymphs, the pink version is suggestive of eggs and scuds at least as much as mayflies and midges. As such, the pattern is most effective when eggs and dead/dying scuds are mixing in the flow, most common in late winter and early spring.

Spin up a few Pink Lightning Bugs to try in your home waters this winter. Trail one of these behind a larger pink fly such as the AMEX Czech Jig I posted previously.

My Gussied Lightning Bug also works well in pink, if you’re looking for a “changeup” fly.

Recipe

Hook: Standard scud, #16-18. #18 is usually best.

Bead: 3/32″ to 5/64″ nickel, in either brass or tungsten.

Thread: 8/0 hot pink or fluorescent fire orange.

Tail: Shell pink Antron yarn. Use 2/3 of the the bundle of fibers on #16 and half on #18. The tail should be rather full.

Abdomen: Holographic pink Flashabou doubled around the thread when it’s tied in.

Rib: Small to extra-small red Ultra Wire.

Wing Case: Medium pearl tinsel.

Thorax: Ball of pink dubbing slightly darker than the body and tail, dubbed loose for movement.

Pennant Dun Fly Tying Video

Posted on March 4th, 2021 in Fly Tying Videos

I developed the Pennant Dun in early fall 2020 as a tiny, delicate, yet buoyant and visible mayfly-style attractor dry. Its effectiveness largely derives from its unusual wing and hackle design, which allows for a large wing on a small fly.

While I’m still working on other versions of the basic pattern that are more imitative, as well as using the wing/hackle method on larger attractor-style patterns (a variation of Mike Mercer’s Missing Link using this wing style is in the works, for example), the copper and purple versions of this pattern were good attractors on the Yellowstone River on early fall mornings, when there were a few midges and mayflies hatching, but no real specific hatches.

Recipe

Hook: #14-20 standard emerger hook, here #18.

Thread: 8/0, here purple. Note that the thread will show through the body material, so sometimes it’s good to change thread colors after tying the body, depending on the effect you wish to produce. On the copper version of this fly, I use rusty brown thread under the tail and body, but fire orange for the hackle, wing, and head. I want the hot orange head, but it makes the body too orange if I use it for the whole fly.

Body: Veevus Body Quill, here claret.

Hackle: 1x oversized dun-grizzly, dun badger, or light dun.

Wing: Silver MFC Widow’s Web, trimmed into a pennant shape.

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